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Golden Boots - Bland Canyon Adventure 10" PIAPTK - 049

10"s are SOLD OUT. DIGITAL DOWNLOADS AVAILABLE ONLY.
Ltd Ed of 75 copies, paint by numbers cover with paint set (and potential bonus gift):
One of the earliest Golden Boots releases, this was written, recorded, manufactured (40 copies) and played live in the space of 8 hours in April of 2005. And it is REALLY, REALLY good!. Features Justin Champlin (Nobunny) on drums and a special appearance by Dr. Dog. Comes in a paint-by-numbers cover and includes Golden Boots Brand Watercolor Paints. It is very important to both the band and PIAPTK that these covers actually get painted. But, knowing the collector mindset, we knew that the chances of record nerds actually painting them were slim. So, we decided that we needed to offer a free gift that would be an essential part of the package. In order for this thing to be "complete" you need to have the lathe cut cd-r (with an unreleased song recorded in my backyard on a 1940s wire recorder called "Ugly One" that has been lathe cut into the backside). And you will only receive this once you email a picture of your paint by numbers job (preferably with yourself holding it), thereby making the set complete. Golden Boots and PIAPTK have a history of what Dmitri affectionately calls "dick moves", which I just think are fun, i.e. oversized 7" jackets that protrude obtrusively in your shelf, LPs with cassettes stuck to the front,etc. This is just another in a proud legacy of us making your record collecting hobby more difficult, and thereby more intrinsically valuable to you. Coincidentally (or IS it?), the time it takes to paint the cover is the exact running time of the record. CD shipping is free.

Tracks

  1. Monsters
  2. Constellations of Loving You
  3. Harbor
  4. Lose the Tension
  5. Magic Answering Machine
  6. Cookie, Sparkie, and Dexter
  7. Suitcase (with Dr. Dog)

Pressing Information

Ltd Ed of 75, included silkscreened water colors. Complete set also includes a lathe cut cd-r, though only about 10 people actually did what was necessary (paint the cover and send a picture) to receive them.